How To Write a Truck Driver Resume

Truck driver positions are focused on your hands-on skills, but that doesn’t mean you can skimp on your resume. A high-quality resume that’s targeted to the position you’re applying for will help you generate more interview callbacks and quickly land a job. Keep reading to get tips and examples on how to write a truck driver resume.

  • Entry-Level
  • Mid-Career
  • Senior-Level
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1. Create a profile by summarizing your truck driver qualifications

The profile summary is normally the first section on your resume, and that also makes it your first chance to wow a hiring manager. Make sure to include your years of driving experience and any special endorsements, such as hazardous materials, to show that you have the training and knowledge the position requires. You can also include keywords you see in the job description to help tailor your resume. These are usually found in the job duties or the required qualifications bullets.

Senior-Level Profile Example


Dedicated Truck Driver with 10+ years of experience making prompt, professional deliveries. Skilled at using maps and navigation systems to plan and follow the most efficient route. Draw on extensive knowledge of DOT regulations. Equally effective working solo or on a team.

Senior-Level Profile Example


Dedicated Truck Driver with 10+ years of experience making prompt, professional deliveries. Skilled at using maps and navigation systems to plan and follow the most efficient route. Draw on extensive knowledge of DOT regulations. Equally effective working solo or on a team.

2. Create a powerful list of your truck driver experience

When you write your professional experience section, you’re showing a potential employer that you have succeeded in similar positions before and that you can be an asset to their company. Truck driving positions are focused on being able to transport goods from Point A to Point B safely. However, employers also want to know that you understand DOT rules and regulations, can keep up on documentation and other paperwork, and will be proactive in avoiding accidents or other issues. Focus your bullets on how you helped the company through your duties.

Senior-Level Professional Experience Example


Truck Driver

XPO Logistics Inc, Orange, CA | July 2015-Present

  • Make safe, on-time deliveries while following all traffic laws and company procedures
  • Maintain up-to-date travel logs and delivery tracking records
  • Use two-way radios to communicate any traffic accidents or adverse road conditions to head office and other drivers
  • Maintain a professional image reflecting and upholding the brand values

Entry-Level Professional Experience Example


OTR Truck Driver

Stephen Mercier Transport, Louisville, TN | September 2020-Present

  • Drive freight, flatbed, and refrigerated haulers ~1,500 miles per week
  • Proactively inspect and repair vehicles to prevent accidents, injury, or malfunction

Highlights:

  • Maintained 97% customer satisfaction and delivered to schedule 98% of the time
  • Commended for maintaining accurate logbook records

3. List your education and certifications relevant to truck drivers

You can create a separate section on your resume for your education and credentials. If you’re applying for a job driving a tractor-trailer, you will need to show that you have CDL A training at a bare minimum. However, having other credentials and endorsements can make you a more attractive candidate to a potential employer because you can transport a wider range of goods. If you have a hazmat, liquid/tank cargo, or double/triple trailer endorsement, list this prominently.

Credentials

Template

  • [Credential Name]

Example

  • Hazardous Materials Endorsement

Education

Template

  • [Program Name]
  • [School Name], [City, State Abbreviation] – [Graduation Month and Year]

Example

  • CDL Training
  • Western Pacific Truck School of Oregon, Portland, OR | March 2015

Hiring managers spend an average of just a few seconds on each resume, so they need to be able to skim your resume quickly and see if your skills are a match. Having a bulleted list of your key skills and proficiencies can make this easier. Consider grouping your skills into two categories: technical driving and soft skills that focus more on you as an employee and how you will fit into the company. Here are some common skills truck driver hiring managers are looking for.

Key Skills and Proficiencies
Basic mechanics Cargo handling
Customer service Defensive driving
ELD proficiency Emergency protocols
Equipment knowledge Hazardous materials
Navigation skills Record keeping
Road assessment Safe driving
Understanding of traffic laws Vehicle maintenance

How To Pick the Best Truck Driver Resume Template

Using a truck driver resume template is a smart way to save time when writing your resume. It’s important to pick a template that properly highlights your skills and qualifications and is easy for a hiring manager to skim. Stick to clean, simple templates with basic fonts and black-and-white color schemes. You can break up larger chunks of text with bold, italics, and bullet points to make it more organized and easier to read.

Truck Driver Text-Only Resume Templates and Examples

  • Entry-Level
  • Mid-Career
  • Senior-Level

Caleb Burton
(503) 123-4567
[email protected]
5674 Westbury Lane, Portland, OR 97203

Profile

Proactive, dependable Heavy Truck Driver with zero safety incidents over 7+ years’ experience. Offer advanced knowledge of local routes, safety guidelines, and navigation systems. Motivated to deliver superior client service with every interaction.

Key Skills

  • Customer Relations & Service
  • Reporting & Documentation
  • Team Collaboration
  • Workplace Safety

Professional Experience

Dump Truck Driver, RiverBend Materials, Salem, OR | April 2019 to Present

  • Operate dump trucks and semi-tractor trucks with attached trailers throughout Willamette Valley
  • Deliver dirt, asphalt, aggregate, and other materials to various job sites
  • Keep an accurate log of deliveries, and complete billing paperwork
  • Inspect truck and trailer before and after each trip, keeping equipment in a clean and safe condition

Highlight:

  • Awarded certificate for excellence in safety protocols

CDL-A Regional Dry Van Truck Driver, Western Express, Sherwood, OR | April 2015 to March 2019

  • Operated tractor-trailer trucks with capacity of 26,000+ pounds per gross vehicle weight
  • Used GPS to transport goods over intercity and interstate routes
  • Promptly loaded and unloaded cargo in compliance with all safety guidelines
  • Maintained detailed trip and cargo records
  • Reported any mechanical problems or adverse road conditions to appropriate personnel

Education

CDL Training, Western Pacific Truck School of Oregon, Portland, OR | 2015

Graduate, Hudson’s Bay High School, Vancouver, WA | 2013

Credentials

Non-Excepted Interstate Class A CDL

Tanker Vehicles Endorsement

Hazardous Materials Endorsement

Medical Examiner’s Certificate

Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC)

Frequently Asked Questions: Truck Driver Resume Examples and Advice

What are common action verbs for truck driver resumes?+

It’s easy to get stuck on finding unique words to describe your job duties, but it’s important to use powerful action verbs. Strong, compelling language can better communicate the value behind everyday duties and responsibilities and position you as a better candidate. If you’re not sure how to describe your job duties, check out our list of common action verbs that truck drivers can use on their resumes. Try to start each bullet with a different word for the best impact.

Action Verbs
Adapted Assessed
Delivered Documented
Ensured Followed
Improved Inspected
Loaded Maintained
Navigated Organized
Planned Repaired
Resolved Responded
Scheduled Secured
Transported Unloaded

How do you align your resume with a job description?+

The supply chain depends heavily on having enough truck drivers, which means it may be easier to find open positions, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics is projecting continued average job growth in this industry through 2031. If you’re applying to multiple job openings, it’s important to align each resume you send out with that specific job description. Read the description and qualifications carefully, and try to use as many keywords and phrases as possible in your resume. You can work these into the profile, professional experience, and key skills sections to help your resume make it to the interview pile.

What is the best truck driver resume format?+

Truck driver resumes are generally created with a reverse chronological format, which means the bulk of your resume is your professional experience, starting with your most recent position and working backward. However, drivers with a lot of experience or extra credentials and endorsements may benefit from a combination resume that focuses more on your skills and qualifications.

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Expert Advice
Include a cover letter with your resume
Once you finish your resume, it’s time to start thinking about your cover letter. The cover letter allows you to expand on specific career highlights and explain why you want to work for this company. Truck driver cover letters should be short and focus on meeting the employer’s needs.
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Jacob Meade

Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW, ACRW)

Jacob Meade is a resume writer and editor with nearly a decade of experience. His writing method centers on understanding and then expressing each person’s unique work history and strengths toward their career goal. Jacob has enjoyed working with jobseekers of all ages and career levels, finding that a clear and focused resume can help people from any walk of life. He is an Academy Certified Resume Writer (ACRW) with the Resume Writing Academy, and a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) with the Professional Association of Resume Writers & Career Coaches.

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