Environmental Engineer Resume Examples of 2023

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Jacob Meade

Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW, ACRW)

Jacob Meade is a resume writer and editor with nearly a decade of experience. His writing method centers on understanding and then expressing each person’s unique work history and strengths toward their career goal. Jacob has enjoyed working with jobseekers of all ages and career levels, finding that a clear and focused resume can help people from any walk of life. He is an Academy Certified Resume Writer (ACRW) with the Resume Writing Academy, and a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) with the Professional Association of Resume Writers & Career Coaches.

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Downloadable Resume Examples

Example #1
Environmental-Engineer_Example-1.pdf

Example #1

Example #2
Environmental-Engineer_Example-2.pdf

Example #2

Example #3
Environmental-Engineer_Example-3.pdf

Example #3

Environmental Engineer Text-only Resume Examples

Years of Experience
  • Example #1 #1
  • Example #2 #2
  • Example #3 #3

Aliya Jackson
123 Pine Brook Dr, Miami, FL 12345 | (123) 456-7890 | [email protected]

Environmental engineer with more than five years of experience in municipal government. Naturally curious and committed to gaining and applying new skills. Focused on isolating and solving complex, large-scale environmental issues.

Areas of Expertise

  • Biochemistry
  • Complex problem-solving
  • Environmental investigation
  • Environmental protection & sustainability
  • Facility inspection
  • Field assessment
  • Hazardous waste management studies
  • Policy development & enforcement
  • Pollution control
  • Process redesign & improvement
  • Program development
  • Project review & management
  • Public health
  • Quality monitoring & assurance
  • Recycling improvement
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Reporting & documentation
  • Scientific data analysis
  • Waste disposal

Professional Experience

Environmental Engineer, City of Springfield, Springfield, FL | November 2017–Present

  • Inspect facilities, evaluate data, and prepare environmental reports for managers and the public
  • Control and monitor wastewater and waste air according to environmental regulations
  • Help develop and enforce policies for improved environmental protection and public health

Highlight:

  • Co-developed and led a waste management program that reduced waste by 45%

Education & Credentials

  • Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • Licensed Professional Engineer – Environmental Engineering, Florida

Oliver Green
1221 Victoria Street, Charlotte, NC 93402 | (989) 876-5454 | [email protected]

Licensed engineer with nine years of experience in environmental consulting. Ready collaborator who builds positive, productive relationships with diverse internal and external stakeholders. Committed to professional integrity and excellence in all endeavors. Master of Science in Environmental Engineering. Bilingual: fluent in English and Spanish.

Key Skills

  • Biochemistry
  • Complex problem-solving
  • Cross-functional collaboration
  • Customer relations
  • Environmental investigation
  • Environmental protection & sustainability
  • Facility inspection
  • Field assessment
  • Hazardous waste management studies
  • Leadership consulting
  • Policy development & enforcement
  • Pollution control
  • Process redesign & improvement
  • Program development
  • Project review & management
  • Public health
  • Quality monitoring & assurance
  • Recycling improvement
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Reporting & documentation
  • Scientific data analysis
  • Waste disposal

Professional Experience

Environmental Engineer, Urban Environmental Consulting, Charlotte, NC | November 2013

  • Design and hone processes for recycling, waste disposal, pollution control, and overall public health
  • Collaborate with environmental scientists, geologists, business directors, city planners, and waste technicians
  • Assess and compare field work against project specifications
  • Analyze data and write environmental reports for clients and local and federal agencies

Highlight:

  • Introduced recycling program that reduced solid and hazardous waste disposal by 75%

Education & Credentials

  • Master of Science in Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
  • Bachelor of Science in Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • Licensed Professional Engineer – Environmental Engineering, North Carolina

Languages

Fluency in Spanish | Proficiency in Italian

 

Skyler Thompson
123 W 15th St, Minneapolis, MN 12345 | (123) 456-7890 | [email protected]

Profile

Licensed environmental engineer with more than seven years of experience. Equally effective in a supervisory or hands-on role. Adapt readily to new work challenges and industry conditions. Skilled at putting complex topics in clear terms.

Key Skills

  • Biochemistry
  • Complex problem-solving
  • Contractor relations
  • Environmental investigation
  • Environmental protection & sustainability
  • Facility inspection
  • Field assessment
  • Hazardous waste management studies
  • Policy development & enforcement
  • Pollution control
  • Process redesign & improvement
  • Program development
  • Project review & management
  • Public health
  • Quality monitoring & assurance
  • Recycling improvement
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Reporting & documentation
  • Scientific data analysis
  • Team management
  • Waste disposal

Professional Experience

Head Environmental Engineer, RZE Corporation, Minneapolis, MN | November 2017–Present

  • Oversee 15-person engineering team and contractors for environmental investigations of air, soil, and water quality
  • Record and analyze site data to prepare comprehensive field reports
  • Develop, explain, and promote solutions for better environmental protection

Environmental Engineer, KSM Incorporated, Minneapolis, MN | September 2015–October 2017

  • Conducted hazardous-waste management studies
  • Reviewed and managed projects, consistently meeting deadlines and milestones

Education & Credentials

  • Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
  • Licensed Professional Engineer – Environmental Engineering, Minnesota

1. Delete info that doesn’t apply to your engineering goal

Some professionals make a point to update their resume annually or every time they start a new job. That’s a good habit, but it usually ends up making their resume too long.

If you’ve been updating your resume and only adding to it with each new position or at the turn of the year, chances are your document contains unnecessary information. The following exercise will help you figure out which details you should keep and which you can toss.

For each piece of information on your resume, ask:

  • Is it a basic detail (job title, company name, location, or start or end date) from your recent work history?
    • Yes: Keep it.
    • No: Does it help account for any employment gaps in your recent work history?
      • Yes: Keep it.
      • No: Does it overlap with your target job, or somehow add to your qualification for the role?
        • Yes: Keep it.
        • No: Delete it.

 

Don’t worry if this method causes you to delete work details that are recent, extensive, or even objectively impressive. The only criteria that matters is relevance. If the detail in question doesn’t have relevance to your target job or employer, it doesn’t need a place on your resume.

2. Tell the story of your engineering career

You may have been told to avoid passive phrases like “Responsible for” or “Tasked with” on your resume. But that’s hard to do when you’re unsure of what the active alternative would be.

For an active tone in your writing, always think in terms of a story that describes characters and their actions. (For more on this all-important principle, see Joseph Williams’s popular writing book “Style: Toward Clarity and Grace.”)

And who’s the primary character of your resume? You, of course.

Your resume may contain many details of various jobs and projects, but you should ensure these details highlight you and your past actions in relation to them. A simple way to make sure you’re doing this is to begin every job description sentence as an “I” statement, then take out the “I” and leave the rest of the phrase on your final resume.

Example:

  • [I] Design and hone processes for recycling, waste disposal, pollution control, and overall public health
  • [I] Collaborate with environmental scientists, geologists, business directors, city planners, and waste technicians

3. Avoid non-engineering jargon

Jargon is using a long word when a short word would do. Here’s a classic example: using the words “utilize” or “utilization” when they should use “use.” Utilize has its place, but it’s misused more often than not.

It can be especially tempting to use jargon in the engineering field, where plenty of technical terms don’t actually have a shorter option. These terms have a place on your resume, as long as they’re relevant to your goals. The problem is when you let terms that should be short and simple become words (often ending in “tion” or “ment”) stay long and clunky.

Companies and other authorities use jargon all the time to soften the blow of bad news. For instance, General Motors once described a plant shutdown as a “volume-related production-schedule adjustment.” (You’ll find this and many other examples of corporate jargon in William Zinsser’s classic book “On Writing Well.”)

Take the opposite approach on your resume. Your goal with this document isn’t to conceal bad news but to shed light on the good news of your candidacy. Any time you find yourself using a long word, stop and ask: Is there a shorter synonym? This habit will help you as you craft your resume into a clear, concise record of what you offer to employers.

Key Skills Hiring Managers Look for in Environmental Engineer Resumes

For a better environmental engineer resume, include a “Key Skills” section (as modeled in the resume examples above). This section can help you focus a hiring manager’s attention on your relevant strengths. It can also help your resume perform better in ATS scans. Consider including any of the terms below:

Key Skills and Proficiencies
Biochemistry Complex problem-solving
Cross-functional collaboration Environmental investigation
Environmental protection & sustainability Facility inspection
Field assessment Hazardous-waste management studies
Policy development & enforcement Pollution control
Process redesign & improvement Program development
Project review & management Public health
Quality monitoring & assurance Recycling improvement
Regulatory compliance Reporting & documentation
Scientific data analysis Waste disposal

NOTE: As the above list indicates, you should stick with nouns and noun phrases in this section. Reserve personal attributes and adjectives (like “Resourceful,” “Inventive,” or “Service-oriented”) for your profile summary.

Common Action Verbs Used in Environmental Engineer Resumes

It’s important to have a variety of verbs on your resume. You want to avoid repeating the same generic verb (e.g., “manage”) too many times because it can distract the hiring manager and fails to reflect the dynamic nature of your work. Below are 20 verbs you can use to help you vary the language in your environmental engineer resume:

Action Verbs
Analyze Assess
Collaborate Control
Design Document
Ensure Evaluate
Improve Inspect
Maintain Mitigate
Prepare Protect
Reduce Report
Resolve Review
Study Update

How to Align Your Environmental Engineer Resume With a Job Posting

When you find a job posting that intrigues you, focus on the details provided about the hiring organization. What are the employer’s stated values? Do they overlap with your own? If so, mention that in your resume’s profile section. Doing so will make your resume that much more specific to the job at hand and will increase the likelihood of attracting the hiring manager’s notice.

More Resume & Cover Letter Resources

The Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts that jobs for environmental engineers will increase by about four percent between 2021 and 2031. For more insight on finding opportunities in this field and related fields, check out the links below:

Resume examples

Cover letter examples

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